Let’s Get Rocketed & Life Is Good Meetings

Information on the South Florida Let’s Get Rocketed & Life Is Good Meetings.

A Public Talk and Three Workshops by Dick B. and Ken B. at the CROSS Florida Conference February 8-9 2013

A Public Talk and Three Workshops by Dick B. and Ken B. at the CROSS Florida Conference February 8-9, 2013: http://www.crossflorida.org/

 Public Talk by Dick B. and Ken B.
Title:
“Your Heavenly Father will never let you down!”
(Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th ed., 181)

Dick B. and his son Ken B. will present an overview of Dick B.’s 23 years of research on the roles played by God, His Son Jesus Christ, and the Bible in the astounding 75% overall success rate A.A. claimed for its early days and the documented 93% success rate in early Cleveland A.A. among “seemingly-hopeless,” “medically-incurable” alcoholics who thoroughly followed the original Akron A.A. “Christian fellowship” program. They will give an introduction to the mission and outreach plans of the International Christian Recovery Coalition. And they will discuss Christian Recovery resources—many of which are free—available at the www.ChristianRecoveryRadio.com Web site and elsewhere.

Workshop #1 by Dick B. and Ken B.
Title:
Christian Recovery Principles from
the Bible & A.A.’s Christian Predecessors

Jesus Christ taught in the temple daily (Matt 26:55). Daily in the temple and in every house the apostles taught and preached Jesus as the Christ (Acts 5:42). And believers are encouraged to exhort one another daily (Heb 3:13). What did the A.A. pioneers in Akron do? Bob E. stated on page 118 of DR. BOB and the Good Oldtimers: “. . . [W]e met every night.” Prayer and Bible study were strongly encouraged by A.A.’s predecessors such as the YMCA, the Salvation Army, evangelists such as Dwight L. Moody, gospel rescue missions, Christian Endeavor, and A First Century Christian Fellowship (“the Oxford Group”). What did they do in Akron? “He must have devotions every morning—a ‘quiet time’ of prayer and some reading from the Bible . . .” (DR. BOB and the Good Oldtimers, 131). Dick B. and Ken B. will cover these and other principles and practices from the Bible and A.A.’s Christian predecessors that found their way into A.A. and can be applied in Christian Recovery efforts today.

Workshop #2 by Dick B. and Ken B.
Title:
How the First Three AAs Got Sober &
the Original Akron A.A. “Christian Fellowship” Program
(a 75% Success Rate among “Medically-Incurable” Alcoholics)

How did Bill W., Dr. Bob, and Bill D. (A.A. Number Three) recover “from a seemingly hopeless state of mind and body” (i.e., alcoholism) before there was a Big Book, before there were 12 Steps, before there were any Traditions, before there were any “drunkalogs” or meetings as we know them today? Alcoholics Anonymous (the “Big Book”) states: “There is a solution. . . . The central fact of our lives today is the absolute certainty that our Creator has entered into our hearts and lives in a way which is indeed miraculous. He has commenced to accomplish those things for us which we could never do by ourselves.” (Big Book, 4th ed., 25). Dick B. and Ken B. will recount how the first three AAs got sober and discuss the highly-successful, seven(!)-point Akron A.A. “Christian fellowship” program and 16 of its key practices.

Workshop #3 by Dick B. and Ken B.
Title:
How to Substantially Enhance Your Effectiveness
as a Christian Leader or Worker in the Recovery Arena

In 1990, a young Christian A.A. asked Dick B.: “Dick, did you know that A.A. came from the Bible?” Dick replied, “John, I have been to 1,000 A.A. meetings, and I have never heard that!” John answered, “Read DR. BOB and the Good Oldtimers.” Dick read that amazing A.A. General Service Conference-approved book, and what he found launched him on 23 years of research into the roles played by God, His Son Jesus Christ, and the Bible in the astonishing success of early Alcoholics Anonymous with “seemingly-hopeless,” “medically-incurable” alcoholics who thoroughly followed the pioneer A.A. path. Dick B. and Ken B. will share from Dick’s 46 titles, 1,250 articles, and hundreds of audio talks about how—largely through the use of “Conference-approved” literature–recovery leaders and workers involved with A.A., N.A., and Christian recovery outreach can become much more effective in their efforts. One such way is to become a “Participant” (no charge—free!) in the International Christian Recovery Coalition (www.ChristianRecoveryCoalition.com).

Christian Recovery Organization Summit of South Florida (CROSSFlorida) is Friday and Saturday, February 8th and 9th, 2013 in Miami Florida.

“Do you have a family member or friend whose behavior is affecting you or your family? Are you a Pastor who does not know how to help a member of your congregation who is addicted to pornography, drugs or alcohol?

Or maybe you are in recovery or wish to be; or you are the leader of your church’s Christian recovery ministry and you would like to connect with other South Florida based Christ-centered recovery ministries/ministry leaders. If so, there is good news.

On February 8 & 9, 2013, CROSStFLORIDA will be hosting the first Christian Recovery Conference in South Florida. This non-denominational summit seeks to present Christian Recovery as it was in its beginnings and will be held at the First Presbyterian Church in downtown Miami. Activities include concerts; keynote speakers; and workshops covering Alcohol and Drug abuse, food addiction, post-abortion trauma, co-dependency, grief, and many other areas of dysfunction.

——————————————-

This conference will be held at First Miami Presbyterian Church at 609 Brickell Avenue, located on the Miami river in the heart of Miami and one of the oldest and most beautiful churches in South Florida. A charming historic facility. Excellent restaurants and hotels are located within walking distance of the site.

The Cross Florida Summit brings Christians and Christian Recovery Groups together to praise the Lord and bring even more excitement and fellowship into this growing movement. We uplift and edify each other and enjoy a wonderful fellowship of believers. Check out the webpage and see if it is something you wish to be involved with and also share it with others – We hope we hear from you and get to meet you in Miami in February.

http://www.crossflorida.org/

New Russell S. Step Series Starting Saturday 12/15/2012

A new Russell S. Step Series will begin this Saturday, December 15th 2012, 5:30PM at

THE TRIANGLE CLUB
17636 Franjo Road
Miami, Florida

http://franjotriangleclub.org/

Lost Password?

Folks – sorry about the broken ‘Lost Password’ form. It should be working now in case you need it: Lost Password

A.A. Vermont Roots Workshop in Early September

PRESS RELEASE July 27, 2012
Contact:
Richard G. Burns, JD, CDAAC
(Pen name: Dick B.)
PO Box 837, Kihei, HI 96753
808-874-4876; DickB@DickB.com

A.A.’s Vermont Roots in St. Johnsbury, Manchester, and East Dorset to Be Studied By International Christian Recovery Coalition Participants in September 3-8, 2012 Workshops

International Christian Recovery Coalition participants and other interested individuals from the United States and Canada will gather together from September 3 to September 8 at key locations in St. Johnsbury, Manchester, and East Dorset, Vermont. They will participate in workshops, tours, investigations, reviews of historical records, discussions of A.A.’s Christian roots and today’s Christian Recovery Movement, with talks by Dick B. and Ken B., A.A. historians from Maui, Hawaii.

The average participant in Alcoholics Anonymous, recovery programs, counseling, and even Christian recovery fellowships knows little or nothing about most of the extensive inspirations and influences for Alcoholics Anonymous. A large number arose from or were centered in individuals, churches, academies, and organizations in several Vermont towns and villages.

The source locations include: (1) St. Johnsbury, where A.A.’s co-founder Robert H. Smith (“Dr. Bob”) received what he called “excellent training” in the Bible as a youngster; (2) East Dorset, where A.A.’s younger co-founder William G. Wilson (“Bill W.”) was born and raised in a Congregational Church setting; and (3) Manchester, Vermont, where Bill W. received further Christian instruction at Burr and Burton Seminary.

But the Vermont confluences of resources did not end in the three towns. Important too were Emerald Lake, Glastenbury, Bennington, and Northfield, Vermont. Moreover, the better known individuals who figured in the picture were: (1) The Griffith and Wilson families in East Dorset; (2) The Burnham and Thacher families of both Emerald Lake and Manchester; (3) Bill’s boyhood friend Mark Whalon, a postman from East Dorset; (4) A wealthy businessman, Rowland Hazard, who carried the message of the necessity for a conversion experience from Dr. Carl Jung in Switzerland to several AAs—to be, and who settled on a large acreage in Glastonbury; (5) Two others. who helped carry the message of deliverance to Bill Wilson’s long-time friend and sponsor Ebby Thacher, who were: (a) F. Shepard Cornell, a New Yorker who regularly summered in Manchester, and (b) Cebra Graves, an attorney, who lived in Bennington.

The George Thacher family (parents of Ebby) owned a large home in Manchester and a cottage at Emerald Lake. The Clark Burnham family—from which Bill’s wife-to-be, Lois, sprang—owned a home in Manchester and two bungalows at Emerald Lake—the latter just a stone’s throw from East Dorset. The Thachers and the Burnhams became good friends. So did Bill, Ebby Thacher, and Lois Wilson, after a time

Both Ebby Thacher and Bill W. (Ebby’s sponsee-to-be, and long-time friend and drinking buddy) had a thorough Christian grounding in their youth. Ebby Thacher got his in at least five ways. First his parental family was involved in Episcopal, Presbyterian, and First Reformed churches. And perhaps a Congregational church in Manchester. Second, Ebby specifically remembered his parental grounding in later years, and as he attended Burr and Burton Seminary at Manchester. And Ebby was exposed to the strong Congregational influences at the Seminary. Third, Ebby attended Burr and Burton during the period Bill W. was a student there. Burr and Burton Seminary, as it was then called, required—as did Dr. Bob’s St. Johnsbury Academy–that students attend daily chapel (with sermons, Scripture, and hymns) as well as the local Manchester Congregational Church. Fourth, this was a period when Bill W. and his girl-friend Bertha Bamford were going to daily chapel together. Bill and Bertha were both involved with the “Y” and its activities while Bill was president of the Young Men’s Christian Association, and Bertha was president of the Young Women’s Christian Association; and Bill was taking a required four-year Bible study course. Finally, during his time at Burr and Burton, Ebby boarded with the pastor of the Manchester Congregational Church where students were required to attend. That pastor was Reverend Sidney K. Perkins, who lived in Manchester, allowed Ebby to live with the family while attending the seminary, and brought about discussions which Ebby considered to be the high point of his life.

Bill’s girl-friend and first love, Bertha Bamford, was the daughter of Reverend and Mrs. W. H. Bamford. Bamford was rector of Zion Episcopal Church in Manchester, and lived with his family in Manchester. Bill met the Bamfords on a number of occasions.

The important A.A. links from the Christian upbringing of Dr. Bob in Vermont were numerous. They were largely confined to St. Johnsbury. And they took several forms. First, in the North Congregational Church of St. Johnsbury with which the entire Smith family were deeply involved. Second, in the church’s Young People’s Society of Christian Endeavor. Third, in the Young Men’s Christian Association of which Bob’s father was president. Also, the strong Congregational influence of the Fairbanks family in St. Johnsbury. Finally, the Congregational St. Johnsbury Academy’s strict requirements of daily chapel, weekly church attendance, and weekly Bible study.

The Christian links from Dr. Bob’s youth in St. Johnsbury were quite similar to those for both Bill W. and Ebby Thacher. This was with respect to the East Dorset Congregational Church; the Manchester Congregational Church, Burr and Burton Seminary’s religious requirements; and, in Bill W.’s case, the seminary’s required four-year Bible study course, and its required daily chapel. Add to these Bill’s, presidency of the seminary’s YMCA.

Four other major Vermont-AA topics will be reviewed, discussed, and documented by the early September Vermont workshops. The first concerns the importance in the co-founders’ youth of salvation and the Word of God. The second is “A First Century Christian Fellowship” known as the Oxford Group. And with which all the named young Vermonters would eventually become associated—those being Bob Smith, Bill Wilson, Ebby Thacher, Rowland Hazard, Shepard Cornell, and Cebra Graves. The next topic has to do with the precursor East Coast Christian organizations and individuals that developed techniques of deliverance for alcoholics; and also espoused personal work with others. These were: (a) the Young Men’s Christian Association; (b) the great Evangelists like Dwight Moody, Ira Sankey, K.A. Burnell, and Allen Folger; (c) the Rescue Missions; (d) the Salvation Army; (e) the United Society of Christian Endeavor; and (f) the Oxford Group, its leaders, and activists. (4) The final major topic will include Christian recovery’s and early A.A.’s immense emphasis on abstinence, First Century Christian principles and practices, accepting Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior, relying on God, holding old fashioned prayer meetings and Quiet Time periods; Bible study; and personal work with, and in love and service to, God, Jesus Christ, and others.


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